Two presentations at ASA Victoria Meeting

Applying machine-learning based source separation techniques in the analysis of marine soundscapes

Tzu-Hao Lin1, Tomonari Akamatsu2, Yu Tsao3, Katsunori Fujikura1

1Department of Marine Biodiversity Research, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology
2National Research Institute of Fisheries Science, Japan Fisheries Research and Education Agency
3 Research Center for Information Technology Innovation, Academia Sinica

Long-term monitoring of underwater soundscapes provides us a large number of acoustic recordings to study a marine ecosystem. Characteristics of a marine ecosystem, such as the habitat quality, composition of marine fauna, and the level of human interference, may be analyzed using information relevant to environmental sound, biological sound, and anthropogenic sound. Supervised source separation techniques have been widely employed in speech and music separation tasks, but it may not be practical for the analysis of marine soundscapes due to the lack of a database that includes a large mount of paired pure and mixed signals. Even when the paired data is not available, different sound sources with unique spectral or temporal patterns may still be separated by apply semi-supervised or unsupervised learning algorithms. In this presentation, supervised and unsupervised source separation techniques will be demonstrated on long-term spectrograms of a marine soundscape. Separation performances under different levels of simultaneous source influence will also be discussed. In the future, more advanced techniques of source separation are necessary to facilitate the soundscape-based marine ecosystem sensing. An open database of marine soundscape will promote the development of machine learning-based source separation. Therefore, we will open acoustic data tested in this presentation on the Asian Soundscape to encourage the open science of marine soundscape.

Information retrieval from a soundscape by using blind source separation and clustering

Tzu-Hao Lin1, Yu Tsao2, Tomonari Akamatsu3, Mao-Ning Tuanmu4, Katsunori Fujikura1

1Department of Marine Biodiversity Research, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology
2Research Center for Information Technology Innovation, Academia Sinica
3National Research Institute of Fisheries Science, Japan Fisheries Research and Education Agency
4Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica

Passive acoustic monitoring represents one of the remote sensing platforms of biodiversity. However, it remains challenging to retrieve meaningful biological information from a large amount of soundscape data when a comprehensive recognition database is not available. To overcome this issue, it is necessary to investigate the basic structure of a soundscape and subsequently retrieve biological information. The recent development of machine learning-based blind source separation techniques allow us to separate biological choruses and non-biological sounds appearing on a long-term spectrogram. After the blind source separation, the temporal-spatial changes of bioacoustic activities can be efficiently investigated by using a clustering algorithm. In this presentation, we will demonstrate the information retrieval in the forest and marine soundscapes. The separation result shows that in addition to biological information, we can also extract information relevant to weather patterns and human activities. Furthermore, the clustering result can be used to establish an audio library of nature soundscapes, which may facilitate the investigation of interactions among wildlife, climate change, and human development. In the future, the soundscape-based ecosystem monitoring will be feasible if we can integrate the soundscape information retrieval in a large-scale soundscape monitoring network.

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